8824 NE Russell St.
Portland OR 97220

Black Lamb

ABOUT

Now in its 14th year of publication, this magazine was created to offer the discerning reader a stimulating selection of excellent original writing. Black Lamb Review is a literate rather than a literary publication. Regular columns by writers in a variety of geographic locations and vocations are supplemented by features, reviews, articles on books and authors, and a selection of “departments,” including an acerbic advice column and a lamb recipe.

SUBMISSIONS

Black Lamb welcomes submissions from new writers. Email us.

QUESTIONS

If you have questions or comments regarding Black Lamb, please email us.

Archive for March, 2002

A Week in Literary History

March 31st, 2002

English novelist John Fowles (The Magus, 1965) is born in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, in 1926.

fowles.pngJohn Fowles, b. March 31, 1926, d. 2005

Before he became famous (and rich) with The French Lieutenant’s Woman in 1969, Fowles wrote two very good books. Thereafter, he lapsed into a decadent life as a chronicler of his adopted town of Lyme Regis and a windy, unreadable “great” novelist. His greatest literary service was in recommending that G.B. Edwards’s incomparable The Book of Ebenezer Le Page be published in 1981.

Suggested Reading Novels The Collector, 1963. The Magus, 1968 (unfortunately revised in 1977). The French Lieutenant’s Woman, 1969.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 31st, 2002

Ukrainian novelist Nikolai Vasilyevich Gogol (Dead Souls, 1842) is born in Velyki Sorochyntsi in 1809.

Nikolai Gogol, b. March 31, 1809, d. 1852

gogolportrait.jpgSo long as people believe in literature, Gogol’s Dead Souls will be read alongside the great novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky — and perhaps with even greater pleasure, providing it is read in the astounding translation by Bernard Guilbert Guerney. The famous Russian heaviness is absent in Gogol, who instead supplies headlong humor and a deliciously mordant satire of life in the Russian countryside. Some, among them Vladimir Nabokov and translator Guerney, regard Gogol and Turgenev as antidotes to the later excesses of Dostoevsky. This may be a matter of taste, but Gogol’s novel can surely be put among the great comic novels of history, and for our money, his Chichikov is as engaging a character as, for instance, Don Quixote or Tom Jones.

Suggested Reading Novels Dead Souls, 1842. Taras Bulba, 1842. Short stories The Nose, 1836. The Overcoat, 1842. Plays The Inspector General, 1836. The Marriage, 1842.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 30th, 2002

Irish dramatist and memoirist Seán O’Casey (Juno and the Paycock, 1924) is born John Casey in Dublin in 1880.

o'caseySeán O’Casey, b. March 30, 1880, d. 1964

In a career that knew more disappointments than triumphs, O’Casey continued to write plays, thirty of them in all, espousing his Irish nationalist and socialist beliefs and sometimes the life of Ireland’s common people. His six-volume autobiography was turned into a film the year after his death, directed by John Ford and featuring Maggie Smith, Julie Christie, Edith Evans, and Michael Redgrave.

Suggested Reading Plays The Shadow of a Gunman, 1923. Juno and the Paycock, 1024. The Plough and the Stars, 1926. The silver Tassie, 1927. The End of the Beginning, 1937. Red Roses for Me, 1942. Cock-a-Doodle Dandy, 1949. Autobiography Mirror in My House, 6 volumes, 1939-56.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 28th, 2002

American novelist Frederick Exley (A Fan’s Notes, 1968) is born in 1929.

Frederick Exley, b. March 28, 1929, d. 1992

After years of work and frequent incarcerations in care facilities for alcoholics, Exley finally published A Fan’s Notes in 1968. Not many people bought it, but it was enormously respected by the critics and by other writers. Thereafter, Exley published two sequels, both of them, like the first book, a mix of fiction and memoir. With alcoholism always a factor, he lived out his post-Notes years with occasional teaching and journalism assignments. In his biography, critic Jonathan Yardley called Exley a brilliant one-book writer, which seems a fair assessment.

Suggested Reading Novels A Fan’s Notes, 1968. Pages From a Cold Island, 1975. Last Notes From Home, 1988.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 27th, 2002

American novelist Rebecca Brown (The Children’s Crusade, 1989) is born in Seattle in 1956.

Rebecca Brown, b. March 27, 1956

brownrebeccacolor3Brown’s reputation has been made in a small circle of gay and lesbian writers and readers, but she deserves a wider audience. Her fictions are beautifully and evocatively written and are not tainted by special pleading. They are literature, pure and simple, not lesbian literature.

Suggested Reading Books The Haunted House, 1984 and 2007. The Children’s Crusade, 1989. Annie Oakley’s Girl, 1993. The Gifts of the Body, 1995. What Keeps Me Here, 1996. The End of Youth, 2003. The Last Time I Saw You, 2006.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 26th, 2002

Much-honored American poet Robert (Lee) Frost (New Hampshire, 1923) is born in San Francisco, 1874.

Robert Frost, b. March 26, 1874, d. 1963

frost.jpgAbout fifty years ago, Robert Frost had become such a literary icon in America that people didn’t read him anymore, but Frost is not all “Stopping by Woods” or “The Road Not Taken.” His poetry, although often deceptively simple in form (not simple to write, however), is always “lovely, dark and deep,” and it lives up to his own definition: “It begins in delight and ends in wisdom.”

Suggested Reading A Boy’s Will, 1913. North of Boston, 1914. Mountain Interval, 1916. New Hampshire, 1923. West-running Brook, 1928. A Further Range, 1936. A Witness Tree, 1942. A Masque of Reason, 1945. Steeple Bush, 1947. A Masque of Mercy, 1947. In the Clearing, 1962.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 26th, 2002

In 1911, influential American playwright Tennessee (Thomas Lanier) Williams (The Glass Menagerie, 1944) is born in Columbus, Miss.

Tennessee Williams, b. March 26, 1911, d. 1983

williamstennesseeIn play after play, Williams gave clear and eloquent voice to the barely suppressed neuroses and passions of his tortured characters. Menagerie, Streetcar, and Cat loom as three of America’s foremost dramas: three hothouses, of different sorts, in which the residents are imprisoned.

Suggested Reading Plays The Glass Menagerie, 1945. A Streetcar Named Desire, 1947. The Rose Tattoo, 1951. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, 1955. Suddenly Last Summer, 1958. Night of the Iguana, 1961. Other Memoirs, 1975. Where I Live: Selected Essays, 1978. Collected Stories, 1994.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 26th, 2002

Popular English poet A.E. (Alfred Edward) Housman (A Shropshire Lad, 1896) is born in 1859 in Fockbury, Worcestershire.

A.E. Housman, b. March 26, 1859 d. 1936

housmanin1896.jpgA profound and prolific classical scholar, Housman will always be remembered for his A Shropshire Lad, the subject of innumerable song settings, and one of the first harbingers, along with Forster’s Howards End and other books, of the demise of a certain kind of rural life in England

Suggested Reading Poems A Shropshire Lad, 1896. Last Poems, 1922. More Poems, 1936.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 25th, 2002

American short story writer (Mary) Flannery O’Connor (A Good Man Is Hard to Find, and Other Stories, 1955) is born in Savannah, Ga. in 1925.

Flannery O’Connor, b. March 25, 1925, d. 1964

oconnorflanneryselfportra.jpgIt is tempting to call O’Connor the greatest short story writer America has produced. All of the stories in the collection A Good Man is Hard to Find, and especially the title story, are absolutely wickedly delicious. But her other stories and her short novels are gold, too. She was a brilliant writer taken too soon (by lupus, at 39) from us. She should be relishing her wise old age now, not forty years in the grave.

Suggested Reading Novels Wise Blood, 1949. The Violent Bear It Away, 1960. Stories The Artificial Nigger: And Other Tales, 1955. A Good Man is Hard to Find, 1955. Everything That Rises Must Converge, 1965.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

March 20th, 2002

British historian and travel writer William Dalrymple (In Xanadu, 1989) is born William Hamilton-Dalrymple in Scotland.

William Dalrymple, b. March 20, 1965

A brilliant historian and curator, Dalrymple has also made a name for himself with his series of travel books concerning India and the countries around it and is considered one of the West’s most insightful interpreters of that part of the world. His vivid and learned books paint a portrait quite different from that of the English colonizers, and one that is a great deal more complex.

Suggested Reading Travel & History In Xanadu, 1989. City of Djinns, 1994. From the Holy Mountain: A Journey in the Shadow of Byzantium, 1997. The Age of Kali, 1998. White Mughals, 2002. Beghums, Thugs & White Mughals — The Journals of Fanny parkes, 2002. Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India, 2009.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

« Previous Entries Next Page »

LINKS

  • Blogroll