8824 NE Russell St.
Portland OR 97220

Black Lamb

ABOUT

Now in its 14th year of publication, this magazine was created to offer the discerning reader a stimulating selection of excellent original writing. Black Lamb Review is a literate rather than a literary publication. Regular columns by writers in a variety of geographic locations and vocations are supplemented by features, reviews, articles on books and authors, and a selection of “departments,” including an acerbic advice column and a lamb recipe.

SUBMISSIONS

Black Lamb welcomes submissions from new writers. Email us.

QUESTIONS

If you have questions or comments regarding Black Lamb, please email us.

Archive for April, 2002

Last Week in Literary History

April 14th, 2002

American novelist Henry James (The Portrait of a Lady, 1881) is born in 1843 in New York City.

Henry James, b. April 14, 1843, d. 1916

jameshenryThey used to tell me, when I was five and twenty and a devouring reader of all things fictional, that I would eventually, perhaps when I was fifty, find Henry James not only interesting, but magnificent. It didn’t happen, at least with the novels. It’s a matter of accretion; all the subtleties, nuances, and elaborately constructed sentences at the beginning of each novel continue to be subtle, nuanced, and elaborate ad infinitum — and always curiously bloodless. We’ve listed some of the novels below, but it’s the tales and short stories that James should be remembered for; they give us the Old Virgin at his best, because least windy.

Suggested Reading Novels The Americans, 1877. Daisy Miller, 1879. Washington Square, 1881. The Portrait of a Lady, 1881. The Bostonians, 1886. What Maisie Knew, 1897. The Wings of the Dove, 1902. The Ambassadors, 1903. The Golden Bowl, 1904. Stories & Tales Novels and Tales, 1909. Other The American Scene, 1907. The Art of the Novel, 1934.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 13th, 2002

In 1906, Irish playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett (Malone Dies, 1956) is born in Foxrock, County Dublin. In 1969 he will win the Nobel Prize for literature.

Samuel Beckett, b. April 13, 1906, d. 1989

beckett.jpgBeckett achieved fame with his plays, especially Waiting for Godot and Endgame. But his fictions deserve greater notice, from the early ones in English to the later ones written in French. Murphy is a brilliant novel, ditto Watt, and Malone Dies is simply one of the most searingly beautiful prose works ever written. The greatest writer born in the twentieth century.

Suggested Reading Fiction More Pricks than Kicks, 1934. Murphy, 1936. Watt, 1945. The End, 1946. Mercier and Camier, 1946. First Love, 1946. Molloy, 1947. Malone Dies, 1948. The Unnamable, 1949. Texts for Nothing, 1950. How It Is, 1960. Poetry Whoroscope, 1930. Echo’s Bones, 1935. Poèmes, 1939. Plays Waiting for Godot, 1948. Endgame, 1956. Krapp’s Last Tape, 1958. Happy Days, 1961. Criticism Dante, Bruno, Vico, Joyce, 1929. Proust, 1931. Henri Hayden, 1955.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 13th, 2002

American author Eudora Welty (The Wide Net and Other Stories, 1943) is born in Jackson, Miss.

Eudora Welty, b. April 13, 1909, d. 2001

welty.jpgAlthough she was born and died in the same city, Jackson, Miss., and seldom spent much time away from it, Eudora Welty achieved an international reputation with her vivid short stories. Although she published five novels and novellas, she continues to be remembered, and honored, like fellow Southerners Katherine Anne Porter and Flannery O’Connor, for her stories.

Suggested Reading Short Story Collections A Curtain of Green, 1941. The Wide Net and Other Stories, 1943. Music from Spain, 1948. The Golden Apples, 1949. Selected Stories, 1954. The Bride of the Innisfallen and Other Stories, 1955. Thirteen Stories, 1965. The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty, 1980. Moon Lake and Other Stories, 1980. Morgana: Two Stories from The Golden Apples, 1988. Criticism Three Papers on Fiction, 1962. The Eye of the Story, 1978. Autobiography One Writer’s Beginnings, 1983.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 11th, 2002

On this day in 1722, English poet Christopher Smart (A Song to David, 1763) is born in Shipbourne, Kent.

Christopher Smart, b. April 11, 1722, d. 1771

Smart was a brilliant, mercurial, sweet-natured man who, as early as his late teens, showed tendencies toward madness and profligacy that eventually resulted in his being imprisoned for both. His poetry, highly regarded by the early Romantic poets, is a unique mix of lyrical passion and almost psychedelic imagination. A fervent Anglican, he wrote, while confined for madness, an entire new liturgy for the English church, Jubilate Agno, which was never adopted but perhaps ought to have been. Two-and-a-half centuries later, it glows with heartfelt belief and curious, loveable ideas.

Suggested Reading Poetry Poems on Several Occasions, 1752. Jubilate Agno, 1939. A Song to David, 1763. Hymns for the Amusement of Children, 1770. Translations The Works of Horace, Translated into Verse, 1756. Translations of the Psalms of David, 1765.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 10th, 2002

American travel writer Paul Theroux (The Old Patagonian Express, 1979) is born in Medford, Mass. in 1941.

Paul Theroux, b. April 10, 1941

Theroux got his taste for foreign climes as an early Peace Corps volunteer, and he wrote seven novels and a book of short stories before finding his true métier as a travel writer with The Great Railway Bazaar in 1975. He has since produced more than 20 works of fiction and 14 more superb explorations of lands from the USA and Argentina to China and the Pacific islands.

Suggested Reading Novels The Mosquito Coast, 1981. Travel The Great Railway Bazaar, 1975. The Old Patagonian Express, 1979. Sailing Through China, 1984. The Imperial Way, 1985. Riding the Iron Rooster, 1988. To the Ends of the Earth, 190. The Happy Isles of Oceania, 1992. The Pillars of Hercules, 1995. Dark Star Safari, 2002. The Tao of Travel, 2011.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 7th, 2002

William Wordsworth (Lyrical Ballads, 1798), future Poet Laureate, is born in Cockermouth, Cumberland, in 1770.

William Wordsworth, b. April 7, 1770, d. 1850

wordsworthengraving.pngWith his friend Coleridge, Wordsworth helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature. His magnum opus, The Prelude, was not published until the year of his death, but by that time he had been for many years the most revered poet in England, perhaps the world.

Suggested Reading Lyrical Ballads, with a Few Other Poems, 1798. Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems, 1800. Poems, in Two Volumes, 1807. The Excursion, 1814. The Prelude, 1850.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 7th, 2002

American short story writer and novelist (Snow White, 1967) Donald Barthelme is born in Philadelphia.

Donald Barthelme, b. March 7, 1931, d. 1989

barthelme.jpgAh, the wonderful Sixties, Seventies, and Eighties, when The New Yorker used to amuse and amaze us with, among other things, the wickedly surreal and satiric short stories of Donald Barthelme. They even printed an entire novel of his, Snow White, in those pages! Barthelme took a good swipe at most of the features of modern life in his stories, while at the same time delighting us with playful language and the absurd argot of academic intellectuals and artcrit speakers, always a prime target. Snow White is a great place to start, then proceed chronologically through the story collections and end with The Dead Father, a strange and oddly triumphal postmodern novel.

Suggested Reading Novels Snow White, 1967. The Dead Father, 1975. Paradise, 1986. The King, 1990. Short stories Come Back, Dr. Caligari, 1964. Unspeakable Practices, Unnatural Acts, 1968. City Life, 1970. Sadness, 1972. Amateurs, 1976. Great Days, 1979. Overnight to Many Distant Cities, 1983. Parodies, Fables, Essays Guilty Pleasures, 1974. Not-Knowing: The Essays and Interviews of Donald Barthelme, 1997.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 3rd, 2002

Welsh religious poet George Herbert (The Temple, 1633) is born at Montgomery Castle, Wales, in 1593.

George Herbert, b. April 3, 1593, d. 1633

Herbert lived a distinguished and apparently blameless life; Izaak Walton called him “holy Herbert.” A Latin and Greek scholar at Cambridge, he turned to preaching and poetry after the death of King James I and became famous in both capacities, although only his first book of poems appeared during his lifetime. A lovely and moving poet, he would doubtless hold a higher position in the pantheon if he had not restricted himself to devotional themes, and if he had not died before his fortieth birthday.

Suggested Reading Poems Parentalia, 1627. The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations, 1633. Devotional commentary A Priest to the Temple, or The Country Parson, His Character and Rule of Holy Life, 1652.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

April 2nd, 2002

French novelist Émile Zola (Nana, 1880) is born in Paris in 1840.

Émile Zola, b. April 2, 1840, d. 1902

Zola will always be remembered for his part in undoing the injustice done to Alfred Dreyfus in 1898 with his screaming headline “J’Accuse!…” He is also important as the foremost of the “naturalist” school that led writers of Europe and America toward realistic — in some cases, devastating — portrayals of their societies. And he helped liberalize France politically.

Suggested Reading Novels La Confession de Claude, 1865. Thérèse Raquin, 1867. L’Assommoir, 1877. Nana, 1880. Germinal, 1885. La Bête humaine, 1890.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, All Medicine Issue, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

« Previous Page Next Entries »

LINKS

  • Blogroll