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Black Lamb

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Now in its 14th year of publication, this magazine was created to offer the discerning reader a stimulating selection of excellent original writing. Black Lamb Review is a literate rather than a literary publication. Regular columns by writers in a variety of geographic locations and vocations are supplemented by features, reviews, articles on books and authors, and a selection of “departments,” including an acerbic advice column and a lamb recipe.

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A Week in Literary History

September 26th, 2002

Anglicized American poet T.S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot (The Wasteland, 1922) is born in St. Louis, Mo., 1888. In 1948 he will win the Nobel Prize for literature.

Thomas Stearns Eliot, b. September 26, 1888, d. 1965

eliotts.jpgWhen the so-called American-born English poet Thomas Stearns Eliot died on his seventy-seventh birthday, he was the most famous poet in the world, and one of the few to have won the Nobel Prize in literature. Having begun as an arch-modernist, he retained his distinctive, laconic voice through his entire career and also single-handedly brought to critical notice the metaphysical poets of the seventeenth century.

Suggested Reading Poetry Prufrock and Other Observations, 1917. The Waste Land, 1922. The Journey of the Magi, 1927. Ash Wednesday, 1930. Sweeney Agonistes, 1932. Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, 1939. Four Quartets, 1943. Drama Murder in the Cathedral, 1935. The Family Reunion, 1939. The Cocktail Party, 1949. Essays Ezra Pound: His Metric Poetry, 1917. The Sacred Wood, 1920. Homage to John Dryden, 1924. Dante, 1929. The Use of Poetry and the Use of Criticism, 1933. Elizabethan Essays, 1934. Notes Toward the Definition of Culture, 1948. Poetry and Drama, 1951. The Three Voices of Poetry, 1954.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

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