8824 NE Russell St.
Portland OR 97220

Black Lamb

ABOUT

Now in its 14th year of publication, this magazine was created to offer the discerning reader a stimulating selection of excellent original writing. Black Lamb Review is a literate rather than a literary publication. Regular columns by writers in a variety of geographic locations and vocations are supplemented by features, reviews, articles on books and authors, and a selection of “departments,” including an acerbic advice column and a lamb recipe.

SUBMISSIONS

Black Lamb welcomes submissions from new writers. Email us.

QUESTIONS

If you have questions or comments regarding Black Lamb, please email us.

Archive for December, 2002

A Week in Literary History

December 30th, 2002

English writer Rudyard Kipling (Kim, 1901) is born in Bombay, British India, in 1865.

Rudyard Kipling, b. December 30, 1865, d. 1936

Kipling’s brilliant narrative gifts made him one of England’s most popular writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He was the first English-language writer to win the Nobel Prize and remains the youngest (at forty-two). His short stories and incomparable children’s works are still fresh a century later, even though his view of colonialism has vanished.

Suggested Reading Novels The Light that Failed, 1890. Captains Courageous, 1897. Kim, 1901. Puck of Pook’s Hill, 1906. Short stories Plain Tales from the Hills, 1888. The Phantom Rickshaw, 1888. The Jungle Book, 1893. The Second Jungle Book, 1894. Just So Stories, 1902. Poetry Mandalay, 1890. Gunga Din, 1890. If—, 1895. Non-fiction The White Man’s Burden, 1899.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 30th, 2002

In 1869, Anglo-Canadian humorist Stephen Leacock (The Garden of Folly, 1924) is born in Swanmore, Hampshire.

Stephen Leacock, b. December 30, 1869, d. 1944

leacock.jpgJudging from book sales, from 1910 to 1925 Leacock was the most widely read English-speaking author in the world. But humorous writing is the most fragile, the most liable not to age well, and now one has to pick and choose from his vast output. It’s worth the effort, though, because, at his best, he is drop-dead hilarious. Get the anthology called Laugh with Leacock and be ready to howl out loud.

Suggested Reading Humor Literary Lapses, 1910. Nonsense Novels, 1911. Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town, 1912. Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich, 1914. Further Foolishness, 1916. The Garden of Folly, 1924. Literary Studies Essays and Literary Studies, 1916. Mark Twain, 1932. Charles Dickens: His Life and Work, 1933.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 27th, 2002

In 1901, English film actress and novelist Irene Handl (The Sioux, 1965) is born in London.

Irene Handl, b. December 27, 1901, d. 1987

handl*Handl is far more famous in Great Britain for her work as an actor than as a littérateuse: she appeared in more than a hundred films and also as a guest on British television comedy series. Her literary output is small — just three novels — but choice. And inimitably, deliciously unique.

Suggested Reading Novels The Sioux, 1965. The Gold Tip Pfitzer, 1966. The Green and Purple Dream, 1973.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 26th, 2002

English poet Thomas Gray (Elegy in a Country Churchyard, 1751) is born in London in 1716.

grayengravingThomas Gray, b. December 26, 1716, d. 1771

Gray is now remembered almost entirely for one poem, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (1751), which gave us such phrases as “paths of glory,” “celestial fire,” “some mute inglorious Milton,” “far from the madding crowd,” “the unlettered muse,” and “kindred spirit.” Gray himself preferred a couple of his Pindaric odes, and others occasionally mention Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College. But most poets would sacrifice much to have written only the Elegy.

Suggested Reading Poetry The Complete Poems, ed. H.W. Starr, 1966.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 26th, 2002

In 1891, American novelist Henry Miller (Tropic of Cancer, 1934) is born in New York City.

millerhenry1934.pngHenry Miller, b. December 26, 1891, d. 1980

Miller settled happily into his role as aging satyr during the Sixties and Seventies, but before that he had helped open the floodgates in literature with his sexually explicit (and sexually fixated) novels. His penis (and his novels) aside, he is an amusing, likeable, and vivid writer who left some memorable books behind, and who spoke the plain truth far more often than not.

Suggested Reading Novels Tropic of Cancer, 1934. Black Spring, 1936. Tropic of Capricorn, 1939. The Rosy Crucifixion trilogy, 1949-60. Other writings The Colossus of Maroussi, 1941. The Air-Conditioned Nightmare, 1945. The Books in My Life, 1952. Quiet Days in Clichy, 1956. Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch, 1957.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 24th, 2002

In 1931, Austrian-American experimental short story writer and novelist Walter Abish (How German Is It?, 1980) is born in Vienna.

Walter Abish, b. December 24, 1931

Abish gained a reputation in the Seventies as an experimental novelist with Alphabetical Africa, a book in which he conquered triumphantly the enormous narrative restraints he had put on himself. His subsequent How German Is It? is perhaps his best-known work, and his memoir is well worth reading.

Suggested Reading Novels Alphabetical Africa, 1974. In the Future Perfect, 1977. How German Is It?, 1980. Eclipse Fever, 1993. Memoir Double Vision: A Self-Portrait, 2004.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 24th, 2002

English poet and cultural critic Matthew Arnold ("Dover Beach") is born in 1822 in Laleham-on-Thames, Middlesex.

arnold.jpgMatthew Arnold, b. December 24, 1822, d. 1888

Arnold is generally considered one of the three most respected nineteenth-century British poets, along with Tennyson and Browning, but he wrote prolifically in prose, from literary criticism to essays and books on social issues. The son of the famous master of Rugby, Thomas Arnold, he also became an authority on education.

Suggested Reading Poetry The Poetical Works of Matthew Arnold, 1950. Prose The Complete Prose Works of Matthew Arnold, 1960-1977. Biography Matthew Arnold, by George Saintsbury, 1899. Matthew Arnold, by Lionel Trilling, 1939.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 23rd, 2002

French critic and historian Charles-Augustin Sainte-Beuve (Portraits contemporains, 1846) is born in Boulogne, 1804.

Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve, b. December 23, 1804, d. 1869

The greatest of France’s literary critics and historians, whose essays on French and English writers influenced all subsequent generations of readers, Sainte-Beuve made popular the idea that to understand an artist one must understand his biography. Proust and others quarreled with this approach, but Sainte-Beuve’s idea has triumphed over time.

Suggested Reading Port-Royal, 1840-1859. Portraits contemporains, 1846. Les Lundis, 1851-1872. Causeries du lundi, 1851-1862. English Portraits (a selection from Causeries du lundi), 1875.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 22nd, 2002

In 1869, American poet Edwin Arlington Robinson (The Man Against the Sky, 1916) is born in Head Tide, Me.

robinson.jpgEdwin Arlington Robinson, b. December 22, 1869, d. 1935

Robinson is the most old-fashioned of famous twentieth-century poets, and unique in the sense that from his forties on, he was a professional poet, spending his summers at the MacDowell Colony and the rest of the year in New York City. Amidst his longer poems, it’s easy to forget the secure and often audacious mastery of his short ones.

Suggested Reading Poems The Children of the Night, 1897. The Man Against the Sky, 1916. Tristram, 1927. Collected Poems, 1937.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

A Week in Literary History

December 21st, 2002

In 1892, English author Rebecca West (Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, 1942) is born Cicily Isabel Fairfield in Streathem.

Rebecca West, b. December 21, 1892, d. 1983

westrebecca.jpgA vivacious, politically-committed woman, West began writing in radical periodicals while still a student at George Watson’s Ladies’ College in Edinburgh and took her pen name from one of Ibsen’s emancipated heroines. Her early novels and critical studies, excellent in themselves, nevertheless seem preludes to her masterwork Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, in which she shows a mastery of description and fluency of style that put her in very select company. Even more rare, she’s a writer’s writer but also a reader’s writer.

Suggested Reading Novels The Judge, 1922. Harriet Hume, 1929. The Thinking Reed, 1936. Critical Studies Henry James, 1916. D.H. Lawrence: An Elegy, 1930. Arnold Bennett Himself, 1931. Other Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, 1941. The Meaning of Treason, 1947.

Posted by: The Editors
Category: A Week in Literary History, Books and Authors | Link to this Entry

« Previous Entries Next Page »

LINKS

  • Blogroll